Appeals for more 20 mph zones

Free Press Series: Appeals for more 20 mph zones Appeals for more 20 mph zones

FIGURES released by the Welsh Government showed that 100 cyclists were killed or seriously injured on Welsh roads last year.

The statistics also showed that 63 young people were killed or seriously injured as pedestrians.

The majority of casualties occurred in areas with a 30mph speed limit, with no child cycling casualties occurring in 20mph zones in Wales.

Sustrans Cymru, a charity encouraging people to travel by bike, foot or public transport, is appealing for more 20mph zones across the country in a bid to reduce the number of casualties.

The charity’s national director Jane Lorimer said: “Every child hurt or killed on Welsh roads is one too many and the number of child pedestrian casualties is of particular concern.

“We need more 20mph speed limits in communities across Wales, which will reduce casualties and ensure any collisions that do happen are less severe.

“The Minister for Transport has spoken about the need to make the walk to school safer and these figures indicate she is absolutely right. The figures also show that cyclists remain most likely to be injured at junctions and when simply heading straight on”.

Comments (7)

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8:12am Thu 3 Jul 14

Dai Rear says...

Before urging more spending of borrowed money it might be helpful to establish whether the statistic is significant or whether because there are too few 20 limits, nothing can be inferred. I live in a 30 limit area and would guess it's only observed by 40% of car and truck drivers.
That will mean that when tachos become compulsory by 2025 they will only do 2 days' up and down commute on that road before totting up 12 points-interesting.
Before urging more spending of borrowed money it might be helpful to establish whether the statistic is significant or whether because there are too few 20 limits, nothing can be inferred. I live in a 30 limit area and would guess it's only observed by 40% of car and truck drivers. That will mean that when tachos become compulsory by 2025 they will only do 2 days' up and down commute on that road before totting up 12 points-interesting. Dai Rear
  • Score: 2

8:15am Thu 3 Jul 14

davidcp says...

Do the statistics also show what the causes of the RTC's were? Not wholly against appropriate speed limiting, but a recent cyclist death near me wasn't about speed, it was a car turning left into a junction across the path of a cyclist. I don't know more than that so I don't know whether the cyclist was travelling fast(ish) or whether the car even knew he was there. BUT
Question - if a car cannot undertake a vehicle which may turn left, why can a cyclist? Answer - 'cos he thinks he can.
How many cyclists are injured because they are in slow moving traffic and undertaking a vehicle that, signalling or not, turns across them just at the 'right' (sic) moment. How many ride through red traffic lights? Saw one this week.
So another, partner solution would be for all cyclists to have to take the old proficiency test - at the moment they can jump on a bike and off they go, winging it. Emphasise - I'm not blaming cyclists or motorists, each bump has its own circumstances. And seeing the inability of drivers in general to adhere to the simplest of Highway Code Rules (signalling at roundabouts at Rechem in Cwmbran, for example) I'm not sure I'd want to ride a bike on the road, anyway.
Do the statistics also show what the causes of the RTC's were? Not wholly against appropriate speed limiting, but a recent cyclist death near me wasn't about speed, it was a car turning left into a junction across the path of a cyclist. I don't know more than that so I don't know whether the cyclist was travelling fast(ish) or whether the car even knew he was there. BUT Question - if a car cannot undertake a vehicle which may turn left, why can a cyclist? Answer - 'cos he thinks he can. How many cyclists are injured because they are in slow moving traffic and undertaking a vehicle that, signalling or not, turns across them just at the 'right' (sic) moment. How many ride through red traffic lights? Saw one this week. So another, partner solution would be for all cyclists to have to take the old proficiency test - at the moment they can jump on a bike and off they go, winging it. Emphasise - I'm not blaming cyclists or motorists, each bump has its own circumstances. And seeing the inability of drivers in general to adhere to the simplest of Highway Code Rules (signalling at roundabouts at Rechem in Cwmbran, for example) I'm not sure I'd want to ride a bike on the road, anyway. davidcp
  • Score: 6

9:03am Thu 3 Jul 14

westsi1983 says...

A lot of people like to throw blame around for accidents that do happen, but what these statistics hide is that for every accident there will be 50 near misses. I have had plenty, and each time I always ask what I could have done differently to avoid it. Given that all of my near misses on a bike are out on open road and are either being squeezed by an overtaking driver or having a driver pass me and immediately turn left. What could I have done differently?! I had hi viz and lights on, in all cases the driver saw me, because overtaking is a conscious decision. The only thing I could possibly have done differently is to ride wider of the kerb so that I have somewhere to swerve when the wing mirror almost hits my handlebars or not gone out at all.
So when I read these kinds of story I always count myself as lucky that so far I have only had near misses.
20mph speed limits won't work, people don't obey the 30 limit, let alone 20. Worst offenders always seem to be the locals too.
I do raise a serious question though, if the only thing that the government can do to ensure pedestrian and cycle safety is ban them from entering our roads, do we have something seriously wrong?!
A lot of people like to throw blame around for accidents that do happen, but what these statistics hide is that for every accident there will be 50 near misses. I have had plenty, and each time I always ask what I could have done differently to avoid it. Given that all of my near misses on a bike are out on open road and are either being squeezed by an overtaking driver or having a driver pass me and immediately turn left. What could I have done differently?! I had hi viz and lights on, in all cases the driver saw me, because overtaking is a conscious decision. The only thing I could possibly have done differently is to ride wider of the kerb so that I have somewhere to swerve when the wing mirror almost hits my handlebars or not gone out at all. So when I read these kinds of story I always count myself as lucky that so far I have only had near misses. 20mph speed limits won't work, people don't obey the 30 limit, let alone 20. Worst offenders always seem to be the locals too. I do raise a serious question though, if the only thing that the government can do to ensure pedestrian and cycle safety is ban them from entering our roads, do we have something seriously wrong?! westsi1983
  • Score: 1

6:08pm Thu 3 Jul 14

endthelies says...

My suggestion is that more police are put on the roads to stop the (mostly) young adults who race around as if they were on a grand prix track. Speed limits won't sop them, neither do speed bumps. They just carry on regardless because they know no one is going to stop them unless there is an accident and even then, very often, the police don't come to the scene of an accident unless there is a casualty. I know this from experience unfortunately. We ended up finding the boy who was speeding around our residency, racing with another car no less whilst on the wrong side of the road. Police said they couldn't come until the next day, even though my daughters car was smashed in and two teenagers that were walking past had a very, very near miss when he mounted the pavement. Hubby and son went looking for the offender who had run off and low and behold, they found him!
My suggestion is that more police are put on the roads to stop the (mostly) young adults who race around as if they were on a grand prix track. Speed limits won't sop them, neither do speed bumps. They just carry on regardless because they know no one is going to stop them unless there is an accident and even then, very often, the police don't come to the scene of an accident unless there is a casualty. I know this from experience unfortunately. We ended up finding the boy who was speeding around our residency, racing with another car no less whilst on the wrong side of the road. Police said they couldn't come until the next day, even though my daughters car was smashed in and two teenagers that were walking past had a very, very near miss when he mounted the pavement. Hubby and son went looking for the offender who had run off and low and behold, they found him! endthelies
  • Score: 2

6:51pm Thu 3 Jul 14

Dave on his Soapbox says...

...living on a road that is just down from a school which has a 20mph speed limit....I concur with many of the comments....without effective enforcement of speed limits....and the increasing number of drivers who go through red traffic lights....including cyclist......just making more roads limited to 20mph will have a limited reduction in deaths and injuries.

an what about making the wearing of cycling helmets compulsory....and enforcing the existing laws on bicycle lighting....the number of cyclists I see in poor light or a night without any fitted....along with the recent council policy of turning off lights at night....need to be looked at in when analysing stats.....
...living on a road that is just down from a school which has a 20mph speed limit....I concur with many of the comments....without effective enforcement of speed limits....and the increasing number of drivers who go through red traffic lights....including cyclist......just making more roads limited to 20mph will have a limited reduction in deaths and injuries. an what about making the wearing of cycling helmets compulsory....and enforcing the existing laws on bicycle lighting....the number of cyclists I see in poor light or a night without any fitted....along with the recent council policy of turning off lights at night....need to be looked at in when analysing stats..... Dave on his Soapbox
  • Score: 1

2:15pm Fri 4 Jul 14

varteg1 says...

Keep it up chaps, soon we'll all be driving on rails.

The amount of control on roads today tells me that the authorities are too scared to actually do what is necessary, that is remove what is nothing more than body weight on a skimpy frame, virtually uncontrollable, and certainly no match for, a one tonne lump of powerful metal.

I am sure many get their final orders due to their own misdeeds.

Yesterday a guy on a bike shot across in front of me as I was exiting a roundabout, he was riding on the pavement, and bounced his bike off that in to the road; how I missed hitting him is a miracle, and a good job my brakes worked as they should, otherwise he'd have been a candidate for either the casualty department or the morgue at the Royal Gwent.

That is not the first time such has happened, a couple of years ago, a youth on a bike came straight out of a side ;passage, right under the front of my car,. He finished up with a broken leg and some rib damage, my speed, on an otherwise clear road , a main bus route, was below the limit.
Another, a little girl, came out of a side entry between two houses, her bike went under the front wheel of my car, she went over the bonnet. The bike was a write off, she escaped with a grazed knee and a sore shoulder. again I was driving well below the limit.
Had I been speeding she would have either slammed into my side door, or maybe missed by an inch or two as she went behind my car. Had that happened, in fact she may well have been dead because the car that passed me going the other way would have probably hit her full on.

Same with pedestrians, few seem to realise just how close they come to being dead, many are accidents walking into the path of oncoming vehicles. stepping off the kerb, without the slightest perception of the danger they face by their erratic way of approaching the road.

Roads are now so heavily laden with vehicles, the laws pertaining to them desperately need bringing up from when they were made, to accommodate the roads of the 1950's and before.

Cars ,on the other hand, have more or less kept up to date, it's now time for pedestrian and cycling laws to catch up.
All these 'pedestrian' comfort zoning measures do is make the pedestrian think they have absolute rights when outside their home etc, nothing beats the braking of two legs, and with the best will in the world, translating mechanical braking will never be a match for TAKING CARE as a motto, be they pedestrians or cyclists.
A moment of carelessness can mean the difference between living dying or being stuck in a wheelchair for life.
Again, those safety measures so recently foisted on almost ever urban road, are no replacement for proper observation when outside one's own front door.
Keep it up chaps, soon we'll all be driving on rails. The amount of control on roads today tells me that the authorities are too scared to actually do what is necessary, that is remove what is nothing more than body weight on a skimpy frame, virtually uncontrollable, and certainly no match for, a one tonne lump of powerful metal. I am sure many get their final orders due to their own misdeeds. Yesterday a guy on a bike shot across in front of me as I was exiting a roundabout, he was riding on the pavement, and bounced his bike off that in to the road; how I missed hitting him is a miracle, and a good job my brakes worked as they should, otherwise he'd have been a candidate for either the casualty department or the morgue at the Royal Gwent. That is not the first time such has happened, a couple of years ago, a youth on a bike came straight out of a side ;passage, right under the front of my car,. He finished up with a broken leg and some rib damage, my speed, on an otherwise clear road , a main bus route, was below the limit. Another, a little girl, came out of a side entry between two houses, her bike went under the front wheel of my car, she went over the bonnet. The bike was a write off, she escaped with a grazed knee and a sore shoulder. again I was driving well below the limit. Had I been speeding she would have either slammed into my side door, or maybe missed by an inch or two as she went behind my car. Had that happened, in fact she may well have been dead because the car that passed me going the other way would have probably hit her full on. Same with pedestrians, few seem to realise just how close they come to being dead, many are accidents walking into the path of oncoming vehicles. stepping off the kerb, without the slightest perception of the danger they face by their erratic way of approaching the road. Roads are now so heavily laden with vehicles, the laws pertaining to them desperately need bringing up from when they were made, to accommodate the roads of the 1950's and before. Cars ,on the other hand, have more or less kept up to date, it's now time for pedestrian and cycling laws to catch up. All these 'pedestrian' comfort zoning measures do is make the pedestrian think they have absolute rights when outside their home etc, nothing beats the braking of two legs, and with the best will in the world, translating mechanical braking will never be a match for TAKING CARE as a motto, be they pedestrians or cyclists. A moment of carelessness can mean the difference between living dying or being stuck in a wheelchair for life. Again, those safety measures so recently foisted on almost ever urban road, are no replacement for proper observation when outside one's own front door. varteg1
  • Score: 1

3:15pm Fri 4 Jul 14

-trigg- says...

A 20mph limit outside schools makes sense - when there is a risk of children running out into the road. That same 20mph limit is far harder to justify at 3am on a deserted main road.

The current speed limits were set half a century ago when cars and stopping distances were much different to today. We now have the technology available for speed limits to vary according to the time of day and road conditions so we should take advantage of it.

I would be in favour of a variety of limits running from 20 or even 10 mph outside a school during school hours to over 100 on an empty motorway late at night.
A 20mph limit outside schools makes sense - when there is a risk of children running out into the road. That same 20mph limit is far harder to justify at 3am on a deserted main road. The current speed limits were set half a century ago when cars and stopping distances were much different to today. We now have the technology available for speed limits to vary according to the time of day and road conditions so we should take advantage of it. I would be in favour of a variety of limits running from 20 or even 10 mph outside a school during school hours to over 100 on an empty motorway late at night. -trigg-
  • Score: 0
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